I won’t tell you what to do.

I mentioned before that some clients like things simple. Simple is good.

However, when clients are motivated to learn more, I work with them to define solutions for their needs which are at a technological level they are comfortable with. Then I train and empower them so they can be self-sufficient.

So, regardless of an individual’s technical aptitude, I believe the best way to provide tools the user will benefit from is to watch their work process and learn about the documents they need to produce. Asking someone what they want to learn about software – when they don’t know the software – is a waste of time and money.

I ask clients what they need to accomplish, what documents they need to produce, and what materials they already have. Then I help them achieve their goals more quickly and easily, taking into account their resources, work habits and needs, not just the features of the software and/or the capabilities of the computer support personnel (or consultants).

If a client doesn’t need me anymore, I’ve done a good job.

Don’t get me wrong – I like my clients, but I don’t need to see (or talk to) them everyday. I don’t keep any secrets in an effort to make clients need me. My goal is that they maintain the software tools I’ve created or set up for them – all on their own.

So, for those who prefer to keep things simple, I operate by this rule:

“The best, most efficient, advanced methods are worth nothing if the people who are supposed to use them – don’t.”

Creating technological solutions for document production which are beyond the capabilities of the user and staff requires constant computer support. Many firm’s computer support staff are already overloaded taking care of their network, time and billing software, firm internet services and other highly technical and time consuming projects. My goal is to help staff and attorneys use their computers more efficiently, without the need for frequent troubleshooting.